Old Exchange Flaw Persists in iOS 7

A series of symptoms that often arrive hand in hand, sporadically, on Apple devices running various revisions of iOS 4, 5 and 6, up through 6.1.3.  Those symptoms include devices running warm to the touch or even hot, a battery that may drain significantly faster than normal, and spikes in cellular data use of up to ten times the user’s normal pattern.  While this trio of symptoms may well have more than one culprit, the many instances that I’ve personally witnessed have since been reduced to a single common cause.  One with a quick solution.

For All Of Us
If your iPhone, iPad or iPod touch ever begins running warmer than normal, or the battery drains twice as fast, or you get sticker shock on your next cellular bill, you’ll obviously want to quickly determine the cause.  Fortunately, with iOS 7, this is easier than ever before.  Begin by navigating to Settings > Cellular.  Scroll down, and you’ll see data usage for native and 3rd-party apps directly under each application’s names.  But don’t stop there.  Also navigate into > System Services, and observe your usage here too.  If your device connects to your company’s Microsoft Exchange e-mail environment, don’t be surprised to see a high number next to Exchange Accounts.  And if you do, read on.
Cellular use stats are a good way to identify any application working overtime.

Cellular use stats are a good way to identify any application working overtime.

For Microsoft Exchange Users
As we alluded to earlier (after giving it away in the title, lead graphic and caption), virtually every instance of heat + battery drain + runaway data use that I’ve personally witnessed has been the result of a sudden-onset problem syncing a Microsoft Exchange calendar.  When an iOS device encounters an error syncing an Exchange calendar, it simply retries.  In fact, it retries every couple of seconds or so, nonstop, 24 hours a day, forever if you let it.  Unfortunately this is nothing new.

If you think this may be happening to you, but aren’t sure, you might consider contacting your company’s IT Department or Microsoft Exchange Administrator.  We’ll talk about what he or she can do in the next section. Having said that, the potential fix is easy, non-destructive, and you can try it out to see if it solves your problem.  As illustrated below, you’ll simply navigate to your Exchange account settings, turn your Calendars off, and then turn them back on.  While one step, “Delete from My iPhone”, sounds ominous, you’ll get your calendar entries back when you re-sync with the server.  Further instructions follow in the next caption box.  Please read and re-read them.  And use them at your own risk.
On your device, select Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars > (your Exchange account). Turn off ‘Calendars’ and then ‘Delete from My iPhone.’ Wait thirty seconds, and turn Calendars back on.

On your device, select Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars > (your Exchange account). Turn off ‘Calendars’ and then ‘Delete from My iPhone’. Wait thirty seconds, and turn Calendars back on.

For Microsoft Exchange Administrators
Keep an eye on the IIS log files on your Exchange ActiveSync server on a regular basis.  By doing so, you may be able to identify a runaway iOS device before the users even know what’s going on.  In larger environments, you’ll likely use automation and alerting tools to bring runaway devices to your attention very quickly.

Source: http://snnyc.com

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